Doing the Research on an OPP Alternative

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Since taking office in November 2016, and before that during the 2014 campaign, I have been told that, at times, our current police service can feel inadequate. After sending the Ontario Provincial Police a number of questions aimed at determining the service Middlesex Centre is provided in exchange for $2+ million per year, and having several discussions with residents and business owners, I came to the conclusion that Middlesex Centre should evaluate our alternatives.

This Wednesday, I’m introducing a notice of motion that seeks to do the homework on evaluating alternatives to the OPP. This motion does not seek to replace the OPP right away, but rather to do the homework needed to figure out whether an alternative would be suitable.

Dr. Jeff King, an area resident and former police officer, has a delegation this Wednesday where he will present a proposal to be considered as part of the evaluation, should the motion pass. He is confident a more effective, more affordable alternative can be formed, and this is his chance for Council to ask him questions.

I encourage you to read the attached material, and provide any feedback you have. Thank you!

Q&A with OPP

1. How many staff (enforcement and administrative) total are located at the stations that primarily serve Middlesex Centre? I imagine this includes Strathroy, Lucan, and possibly Western Region HQ.

Middlesex County OPP has a complement of approximately 90 civilian and sworn members, working from four reporting locations; Strathroy, London, Lucan and Glencoe.

The OPP uses an integrated service delivery model at detachments whereby municipal policing services are provided to contract and non-contract municipalities, while provincial policing commitments are also being met, e.g. policing provincial highways, unorganized territories, etc. Municipalities benefit from the integrated service model as it provides the OPP with enhanced flexibility in meeting fluctuating and changing policing demands and at a lower cost than having one detachment service each municipality. This provides the OPP with enhanced flexibility to meet a variety of operational demands at a lower cost by leveraging economies of scale. Officers in detachments are not assigned specifically as a municipal or provincial officer. The OPP uses a time and activity electronic tracking system referred to as the Daily Activity Reporting (DAR) system, to capture staff data. The system tracks detailed records which include time, work locations, and activities.

2. How many officers are employed at the stations that primarily serve Middlesex Centre?

See answer to question #1

3. Are routine patrols conducted in Middlesex Centre, and with what frequency? (e.g. daily, every other day, once a week, etc.)

The OPP recognizes that random patrol and non-strategic enforcement are not efficient usages of our limited police resources. Focused Patrol is a detachment-based initiative aimed to identify community traffic and crime ‘hot spots’, enabling the organization to better reduce crime and victimization.

4. What areas do routine patrols typically cover? (e.g. Komoka, Ilderton, Ten Mile Rd, etc.)

Patrols cover all areas of a municipality, however enhanced patrols, specifically Focused Patrols are directed to a specific area/issue. See answer to question 5 for a further explanation.

5. What is the difference between a routine patrol and an enhanced patrol?

Focused Patrol is an efficiency-oriented initiative that demonstrates the OPP’s commitment to organizational accountability, crime/traffic reduction targets and aims for the reduction in future calls for service. Through data analysis or complaint driven, officers are directed by their supervisor/detachment commander a specific focus (type of crime/traffic), location (“hotspot”), time of day/night and duration. These seven criteria are required in order to meet the parameters of Focused Patrol:

a) Directed by supervisor/detachment commander
b) Specific focus provided
c) Specific location
d) Time
e) Duration of patrol
f) Number of members involved
g) Specific tracking and reporting requirements met

6. More specifically, what was enhanced about the patrol that recently apprehended two suspects in Kilworth whom are alleged to have been conducting thefts?

Middlesex Centre, and more specifically Kilworth and Komoka experienced significant increases in property crime in the month of August. In addition, officers were being informed that some thefts from vehicles were not being reported. Analysis indicated that the thefts were occurring between midnight and 04:00 hrs so a Focused Patrol was initiated to address this problem.

Twenty officers conducted 106 hours of foot and vehicle patrol from midnight to 4 am from Sept 1st until mid-November. October and November stats indicate that property crime has decreased by 22% from the same period in 2016.

At least 3 parties were identified and charged for property theft from this initiative.

7. How often do OPP officers set up “speed traps” in Middlesex Centre?

Traffic safety initiatives occur daily within Middlesex County, throughout all municipalities served by the OPP. Traffic safety initiatives are not strictly limited to Enforcement, rather Education and Engagement are also employed to make our roadways safe.

8. How successful, in terms of tickets and fines issued, are these “speed traps?”

Traffic enforcement is one of a number of methods used to change driver behaviour to make our roadways safe.

9. How many calls do the OPP respond to on a weekly, monthly, and annual basis in Middlesex Centre?

Over the three year period of 2014-2016 Middlesex Centre experienced an average of 1995 calls per year. Only slight variances in the numbers were observed from year to year and 2017 also remains fairly consistent.

To date (Nov 25) Middlesex Centre has had 1742 calls and if we predict the annual total based on the current year we can anticipate approximately 1937 calls which is a 2.9% decrease from the three year average.

  • Average monthly calls in 2017 were 161, while the 3 year average is slightly higher at 166.
  • Average weekly calls in 2017 were 37 while the 3 year average came to 38.

10. How many calls result in criminal charges being pressed against individuals?

Detailed information on current charge data is not available but I have included information which indicates charges laid per occurrence. The number of charges and number of charged parties is not detailed.

Number of Occurrences where charges were laid

Year – Criminal Code – Provincial Offences
2017 – 168 – 158
2016 – 176 – 182
2015 – 150 – 145